Q: What to expect upon a house call visit?

A: On the first visit, which is usually about 40-60 min, we will review medical records and any available laboratory tests, discuss any current concern (if you have any) various aspects of your pet’s health, diet, and lifestyle as well as personality traits and constitution that might play a role or cause an imbalance or illness. A thorough physical examination will allow a better understanding of any underlying condition.

Depending on your pet’s history, physical examination findings and current concerns, we may recommend further diagnostic procedures such as specific laboratory testing, dietary modification, herbs, nutritional supplements and review different treatment modalities available.

Q: Why should you call for a mobile vet?

A: Here are some reasons you may want to use a mobile vet.
  • Better for individualized one on one care
  • Cost effective for multi-pet house holds
  • Reduce stress on you and your pet
  • Better for the evaluation of your pets home environment and natural behavior
  • For hospice care
  • For cats who does not like to travel
  • For older large breeds and arthritic dogs having a hard time with slippery floors and getting out of the car
  • More convenient for you
  • For the busy owner who does not have the time to go to the clinic

Q: What should I expect during an acupuncture visit?

A: On the first visit, which is about an hour, we will discuss current concerns, medical history, various aspects of your pet’s health and lifestyle as well as personality traits and constitution. Once a TCVM (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine) diagnosis has been determined (disease pattern) we will go over the different modalities of treatment.
Each follow-up treatment, which takes about 30-40 minutes, will start with a discussion of general health and assessment of progress, acupuncture points and diet modification.
Nutritional supplements and herbs can be added to optimize the results.

Q: Is acupuncture safe for animals?

A: Acupuncture is one of the safest forms of medical treatments for animals when it is administered by a properly trained veterinarian. Side effects of acupuncture are rare, but they do exist. An animal’s condition may seem to worsen for up to 48 hours after a treatment. Other animals may become very sleepy for 24 hours after acupuncture. These effects are an indication that physiological changes are developing, and they are most often followed by an improvement in the animal’s condition.

Q: How does acupuncture work?

A: According to ancient Chinese medical philosophy, disease is the result of an imbalance of energy in the body. Acupuncture is believed to balance this energy, and thereby assist the body to heal itself from the disease.

Q: Does acupuncture hurt?

A: For some animals, the insertion of acupuncture needles is virtually painless, for others it may cause some initial discomfort. Once the needles are in place, there should be very minimal or no pain.
Most animals become very relaxed and sleepy while others could be a bit nervous (depends on their personality). Nevertheless, acupuncture treatment may cause some sensation such as tingles, cramps, or numbness which can occur in humans and which may be uncomfortable to some animals.

Q: How long do acupuncture treatments last?

A: The length and frequency of acupuncture treatments depends on the condition of the patient and the method of stimulation that is used. Stimulation of an individual acupuncture point may take as little as 10 seconds or as much as 30 minutes. Methods such as dry needle acupuncture, aqua acupuncture (injection of sterile saline or Vitamin B12), heat therapy and laser therapy as well as electroacupuncture can be used.
A simple acute problem, such as a sprain, may require only one treatment, whereas more severe or chronic ailments may need several or several dozen treatments.
When multiple treatments are necessary, they usually begin intensively and are tapered to maximize efficiency. Patients often start with 1-2 treatments per week for 4-6 weeks. A positive response is usually seen after the first to third treatment. Once a maximum positive response is achieved (usually after 4-8 treatments), treatments are tapered off so that the greatest amount of symptom-free time elapses between them. Many animals with chronic conditions can be tapered off to 2-4 treatments per year.